Skin + Gratitude

When it comes to the health of your skin, the role of mental health is impossible to ignore. Research continues to uncover the connection between our mood and emotions and the physiology of our largest organ. 

One of the simplest and most maintainable practices (that’s also clinically proven to improve emotional outcomes) is expressing gratitude. This tool is as simple as its sounds and anyone can participate. Gratitude exercises are when a person thinks of, speaks, or writes out things they are grateful for. These can be people, experiences, traits or concepts that evoke a positive emotional response. A Consonant favourite is the answer to the question “What is something about your body that you’re grateful for?” 

Why Is Practicing Gratitude Good For My Skin?

Studies show that after participating in gratitude practices, participants have more optimism, happiness, and feel more in control of their lives. Furthermore, these exercises decrease stress markers in the body like cortisol levels and inflammatory proteins. All of which are also linked to the look and function of skin. Less cortisol and inflammation means less risk of developing or exacerbating conditions like acne, rosacea, dermatitis and more! 

So, whether you jot them in a journal, the notes app on your phone, or say them aloud as you wash your face (with Consonant Natural Foaming Face Wash), try incorporating gratitude into your daily ritual for healthy, radiant skin.

Don’t know where to start?

Here are 10 Consonant Daily Gratitude Prompts
  • Something beautiful I am grateful for is…

  • Something that changes I am grateful for is…

  • A physical part of me I’m grateful for is…

  • Something money can’t buy I’m grateful for is…

  • A space in my home I am grateful for is…

  • Something that’s funny I’m grateful for is…

  • Something interesting I’m grateful for is…

  • A memory I’m grateful for is…

  • Something in nature I’m grateful for is…

  • Someone I’m grateful for is…

References

Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, M., Richardson, B., Lewis, V., Linardon, J., Mills, J., Juknaitis, K., ... & Ware, A. (2019). A randomized trial exploring mindfulness and gratitude exercises as eHealth-based micro-interventions for improving body satisfaction. Comput

Salzmann, S., Euteneuer, F., Strahler, J., Laferton, J. A., Nater, U. M., & Rief, W. (2018). Optimizing expectations and distraction leads to lower cortisol levels after acute stress. Psychoneuroendocrinology88, 144-152.

 Jafferany, M. (2007). Psychodermatology: a guide to understanding common psychocutaneous disorders. Primary care companion to the Journal of clinical psychiatry9(3), 203.